By the Book @ Rogers Memorial Library

The Tao of Martha, by Jen Lancaster

“On paper, Oprah trumps Martha in terms of fortune and fame and felony convictions.  But if the apocalypse my tinfoil-hat-wearing husband (bless his heart) predicts is indeed coming, I have to ask myself: Do I want to follow the lady who encourages me to make dream boards for a better tomorrow, or do I want […]

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The View From Penthouse B, by Elinor Lipman

“Since Edwin died, I have lived with my sister Margot in the Batavia, an Art Deco apartment building on beautiful West Tenth Street in Greenwich Village.  This arrangement has made a great deal of sense for us both: I lost my husband without warning, and Margot lost her entire life’s saving to the Ponzi schemer […]

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The Interestings, by Meg Wolitzer

“That night, though, long before the shock and the sadness and the permanence, as they sat in Boys’ Teepee 3, their clothes bakery sweet from the very last washer-dryer load at home, Ash Wolf said, ‘Every summer we sit here like this.  We should call ourselves something.’ “ And thus, the “Interestings” were born in […]

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The Professor and the Madman, by Simon Winchester

“The achievements of the great dictionary makers of England’s seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were prodigious indeed.  Their learning was unrivaled, their scholarship sheer genius, their contributions to literary history profound.  All this is undeniable — and yet, cruel though it seems even to venture to inquire: Who now really remembers their dictionaries, and who today […]

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The Last Runaway, by Tracy Chevalier

“But there was no use dwelling on what her life might have been; such thinking did not help.  She had noticed that Americans did not speculate about past or alternate lives. They were used to moving and change: most had emigrated from England or Ireland or Germany.  Ohioans had moved from the south or from […]

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Vanity Fare, by Megan Caldwell

I know that it’s January and we should be counting crunches and drinking kale smoothies, but sometimes you just need a little treat to get through a chilly day.  I suggest digging into Vanity Fare, by Megan Caldwell.  This delicious book will make you laugh…and make your stomach growl for one of the tasty treats from […]

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The Pigeon Pie Mystery, by Julia Stuart

From a miserly countess, to a doctor so besotted that he steers his bicycle into the Thames, to a palace housekeeper who is convinced that every resident of Hampton Court Palace is hiding illicit pets, The Pigeon Pie Mystery plays host to one of the largest collections of eccentric, quirky and charming characters found in literature. It […]

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Best Books of 2012

Elizabeth’s Picks  Where’d You Go, Bernadette, by Maria Semple Humor Fiction.  When her brilliant and eccentric mother disappears, teenage Bee sorts through a breadcrumb trail of clues – emails, letters, and reports – to find Bernadette.  Semple injects humor, wit and heart into this unique and unconventionally told story of a daughter’s love for her […]

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My Berlin Kitchen, by Luisa Weiss

Moving from Berlin to Boston to New York to Italy to Paris, Luisa Weiss (in the blogosphere, The Wednesday Chef) lived a nomadic life.  As a child, she  shuttled between parents who lived on two different continents, and as an adult she kept moving, searching for a place to call home.  No matter which country she […]

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Based on the Novel

Kate Atkinson is the critically acclaimed author of a series of intelligent and intriguing novels featuring private detective, Jackson Brodie.  Brodie is a troubled man with a failed marriage, and a soft spot for broken and dysfunctional people.  In 2011, the BBC filmed a six-part television series based on several of Atkinson’s novels.  This series, entitled […]

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