By the Book @ Rogers Memorial Library

I’ve Got Your Number, by Sophie Kinsella

“My phone is my people.  It’s my friends.  It’s my family.  It’s my work.  It’s my world.  It’s everything.  I feel like someone’s wrenched my life support system away from me.” How can you not love someone who’s willing to deliver an impromptu singing telegram as a delay tactic (and mega-favor) for a virtual stranger?  […]

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The Rook, by Daniel O’Malley

Myfanwy Thomas has no memory of who she once was.  But her old (and apparently über-organized) self has conveniently left a trail of breadcrumbs to help her figure out what her next step should be.  A “Dear You” note in her jacket pocket brings her up to speed regarding her name, personal identification number and […]

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What I Hate from A to Z, by Roz Chast

Some people count sheep when they’re trying to fall asleep.  Not author and New Yorker cartoonist, Roz Chast.  She plays the Alphabet Game.  To get started, all you need to do is choose a category: fruits and vegetables, rock bands, movie titles, prescription drugs, diseases, you name it, then list one thing per letter in alphabetical order.  Hopefully you’ll be […]

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It Looked Different on the Model, by Laurie Notaro

The subtitle of It Looked Different on the Model gives you a hint about what lurks behind the cover with the fuschia curtain: “epic tales of impending shame and infamy.”  Laurie Notaro is an accident waiting to happen.  From her Ambien-induced shopping and eating sprees, to dental mishaps incurred when trying to teach a lesson to an old […]

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The Call, by Yannick Murphy

BOOK: The Call, by Yannick Murphy ACTION: Looked at cover skeptically.  Do I want to read a book about cows?  I’ve always liked that shade of orange.  Started to read the novel, which doesn’t look like a novel.  It looks like a log of veterinary calls — some of which involve cows.  But it isn’t a […]

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The Last Werewolf, by Glen Duncan

Imagine that your favorite writer of literary fiction — say Annie Proulx, Zadie Smith, Richard Russo, or Jeffrey Eugenides — was hired to write an episode of HBO’s True Blood.  Or imagine that the werewolf in the film, An American Werewolf in London, was having an existential crises and considering suicide.  This is probably the best way to […]

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Smokin’ Seventeen, by Janet Evanovich

If you’ve never met Stephanie Plum, Janet Evanovich’s Jersey girl bounty hunter, you’re in for a treat.  Stephanie Plum is a 30-something resident of Trenton, New Jersey.  She’s most comfortable in jeans and a t-shirt; she doesn’t know how to cook and often ends up at her parents’ home for meals; her roommate is a […]

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Killed at the Whim of a Hat, by Colin Cotterill

“I’d been thrilled when I heard they’d discovered the bodies.  Please let them be murder victims, I prayed. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a bloodthirsty person.  I just needed reassuring that man hadn’t stopped displaying inhumanity to man.  I’d begun to doubt it.” Ambitious Chiang Mai Daily Mail crime reporter Jimm Juree fears her career […]

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Undercover Mom

It has long been my secret ambition to become a spy.  Who would ever suspect an ordinary librarian of being involved in international intrigue?  Alas, my talents remain untapped, so I must satisfy my taste for espionage through the books I read. While I love the intense spy novels of John LeCarre and Daniel Silva, I recently read  […]

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My Year with Eleanor, by Noelle Hancock

What do you fear?  Writer Noelle Hancock was basking on a beach in Aruba, when she found out that she had lost her job.  Goodbye, lucrative celebrity blog.  Hello, unemployment and uncertainty.  The 28-year-old kept her chin up with freelance writing gigs, until she chanced upon an inspirational quote chalked on a blackboard in a café she […]

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